Cello Journey #28, Haydn Concerto in C, 1st Movement

YouTube
Direct Download

In this episode we play the cello concerto in C Major by Joseph Haydn. We decided to play it with organ since it sounds more like an orchestra and it makes a nice match. We are playing in a wonderful church called Mountainview United Church. We hope you enjoy it.

Comments

  1. Wonderful sound with organ. Only heard played with piano and this version trumps all. Was it intended to be played with organ? It’s great!

  2. Luke! That was very enjoyable! I am a big fan of the Concerto. Before, I was skeptical of how the balance would be; if the organ would be too overpowering. But it was spot on indeed! Thank you for this wonderful episode!
    Happy Cello Playing!

  3. That was great Luke, a very refreshing interpretation. I’m curious what Edition you use. I use C.F. Peters and I believe it’s how Haydn originally wrote it. I know other editions simplify a lot of the grace notes and 16th notes into 32nd notes but when you see the grace notes it changes many things. The organ worked wonderfully, it gives it a classical feel. I’m working on this piece for my youth symphony’s concerto competition (it’s an orchestra that specializes in classical and baroque music). I guess I should give you a suggestion. I think I’ll recommend some contemporary music, how about the Shostakovitch Sonata or better yet, the Kodaly Sonata! They are both some of my favorites and you haven’t done any contemporary music. Keep up the good work, Luke!

  4. What a wonderful thing to be able to watch your movements as you interpret this piece. As a relative newcomer to the world of cello, you are the greatest inspiration I have seen. Thanks for your investment in other’s musical lives! Keep up the great work.

  5. This was so much fun! It was so powerful and yet you didn’t go nuts (as I have) with the A minor section. This concerto makes me so happy.

  6. i don’t know much about cello
    in fact i don’t think i know anything about cello
    i don’t even play an instrument
    but i’m in LOVE
    oh my god i love your music !!!
    i looooooooooooove listening to you play
    i think its just soooooooooo beautiful

    I LOVE YOU ! thank you for introducing me to such beautiful music.

  7. Wow, beautiful sound in the church. Wonderful job Ross and Luke. Your cello has some very high arching. I can see from the reflection of light.

    Great job!

  8. This is probably my favorite episode so far! I love the way the cello sounds in the church. I’ve been a fan of yours since your first video and you have inspired me to begin learning cello at 33 years old! Thank you Luke and thanks to Ross as well…this is my favorite podcast! Oh yeah, it looks like you have one of those angled carbon-fiber endpins…nice!

  9. What a start in the new year Luke and Ross. Really great! And what a wonderful idea to go with the organ in a church 🙂

  10. Sue – It is originally for cello and orchestra. The organ is able to sustain more like an orchestra so we thought we would go with it.

    Patrick – We thought about the balance quite a bit to make sure it turned out ok.

    Geeksluvpi – Great music suggestions. Hopefully at some point we can get to those.

    August – You have great enthusiasm. I really appreciate it.

    Antionio – At first we weren’t sure how things would work with organ. We are glad they turned out well.

    Luke

  11. Blown away once again! Lovely arrangement with the organ. It’s amazing how every month you give us a lovely present of beautiful music to inspire and re-inspire. It’s so helpful to novices like me to see the cello being played rather than just hear cello music. Looking forward to the next one! (no pressure, guys!).

  12. Luke,

    keep up the great work- we cellists (as well as other classical musicians) need to keep up with the technology curve. As ‘classical’ is now more easily mistaken for the classical instruments playing soothing smooth jazz, I’m glad you have helped to introduce the cello and its wonderful repertoire to the web audience and ignite an interest again in this music.
    As they say, keep on going from bar to bar, even if it means playing under a rest.
    celloly,
    Randy

  13. Randy – Thank you. I think you are right about classical music keeping up with technology. I get lot s of e-mails and comments from viewers who are discovering these pieces for the first time.

    Luke

  14. Luke,
    You have my deepest gratitude for sharing this wonderful music for my favorite instrument through your artistry. Thanks also for the video of you playing the music; it enriches and completes the experience of the music.

    I finally began playing the cello in my adult life. Many of these young students can play circles around me. On the other hand, over many years I never missed an opportunity to be in the audience to see and hear every cellist who came to town (Cedar Rapids, Iowa) to play with our symphony. I say you are right up there with them!
    I look forward to receiving and listening to your CD. Meanwhile, I will check your website regularly.
    All the best to you and your accompanist in your wonderful work – Pam

  15. Pam – Thank you. Comments like yours make it easier to keep going. Nice to hear that you began playing the cello. Hearing cello with orchestra is fun. Please keep me updated on how things go with the cello.

    Lately I am wondering about something. I am thinking of doing an audio episode of Cello Journey in which I talk more about the music, e-mails, comments, things like that. I am getting this feeling I should do this.

    Luke

  16. Luke, I just won my Youth Symphonies Concerto Competition for this piece! I can’t wait to perform it. Thanks for putting these videos up. They really inspire me to pick up my cello and to play music just for the joy of music and not for a competition or deadline. Thanks again.

  17. Geeksluvpi – That is really awesome! Congratulations! Playing with orchestra is a lot of fun. Let me know how things go.

    Luke

  18. This is truly fantastic. You are inspiring to listen to and I find it mind boggling that you can learn new pieces so fast. I also find that your videos are the best for learning pieces and I have used your site many times (currently Tarantella). I was wondering if I could make a request for Lalo’s Concerto in D minor Prelude. Thank you for playing.

  19. Hi Luke,

    Thanks for your wonderful interpretations. I’ve been watching along in two years now, and i must say, that you have a way of making all the pieces you play to sound good and look so easy at the same time. It is really nice to watch you play! Truly inspiring.

    Do you know the Cello Sonata by the Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich? In my opinion it is a wonderful piece(A shame that I can’t play it yet, but hopefully next year). There actually is a fabulous interpretation of the second movement by the great Rostropovich on YouTube. I know you got your book full of requests, so I’ll back down a bit.

    I am looking forward to the Tarantella in next episode.

    Thanks for playing!

    Tord

  20. Tord – Thank you. I really like the sonata by Dmitri Shostakovich too. It is one of my favorite pieces.

    Luke

  21. Hi Luke,
    As I wrote to you separately, I am very much enjoying your music, and looking forward to the new episodes you announced.

    The Haydn Concerto 1st mov. with organ is so wonderful, and I do hope you two will record the remaining movements of this Concereto under the same setting at Mountainview United Church to give us the entire Concerto, just like you have completed Bach’s Suite No1 BWV1007. You would please seriously consider to complete the Concerto!

  22. Makoto – Thank you. We will do the rest of the Haydn with organ over time. It is a great piece and definitely worth finishing. I think we will do the next movement over the summer.

    Luke

  23. Hi Luke,
    Thank you for your prompt replay.
    I am very much looking forward to hearing the rest of the Concerto. You would please record the rest portion with the same audio quality as you have done for the 1st movement.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *